Download Ebook Anthropocene Reading PDF

Anthropocene Reading

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Publisher : Penn State Press
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ISBN : 9780271080390
Pages : 273 pages
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Summary Book Review Anthropocene Reading :

Download or read book in PDF Anthropocene Reading written by Tobias Menely and published by Penn State Press. This book was released on 2017-10-12 with total page 273 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Few terms have garnered more attention recently in the sciences, humanities, and public sphere than the Anthropocene, the proposed epoch in which a human “signature” appears in the lithostratigraphic record. Anthropocene Reading considers the implications of this concept for literary history and critical method. Entering into conversation with geologists and geographers, this volume reinterprets the cultural past in relation to the anthropogenic transformation of the Earth system while showcasing how literary analysis may help us conceptualize this geohistorical event. The contributors examine how a range of literary texts, from The Tempest to contemporary dystopian novels to the poetry of Emily Dickinson, mediate the convergence of the social institutions, energy regimes, and planetary systems that support the reproduction of life. They explore the long-standing dialogue between imaginative literature and the earth sciences and show how scientists, novelists, and poets represent intersections of geological and human timescales, the deep past and a posthuman future, political exigency and the carbon cycle. Accessibly written and representing a range of methodological perspectives, the essays in this volume consider what it means to read literary history in the Anthropocene. Contributors include Juliana Chow, Jeffrey Jerome Cohen, Thomas H. Ford, Anne-Lise François, Noah Heringman, Matt Hooley, Stephanie LeMenager, Dana Luciano, Steve Mentz, Benjamin Morgan, Justin Neuman, Jennifer Wenzel, and Derek Woods.

Download Ebook Close Reading the Anthropocene PDF

Close Reading the Anthropocene

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Publisher : Routledge
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ISBN : 9781000405064
Pages : 202 pages
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Summary Book Review Close Reading the Anthropocene :

Download or read book in PDF Close Reading the Anthropocene written by Helena Feder and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2021-06-09 with total page 202 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Reading poetry and prose, images and art, literary and critical theory, science and cultural studies, Close Reading the Anthropocene explores the question of meaning, its importance and immanent potential for loss, in the new geological epoch of the Anthropocene. Both close reading and scientific ecology prioritize slowing down and looking around to apprehend similarities and differences, to recognize and value interconnections. Here "close" suggests careful attention to both the reading subject and read "object." Moving between places, rocks, plants, animals, atmosphere, and eclipses, this interdisciplinary edited collection grounds the complex relations between text and world in the environmental humanities. The volume’s wide-ranging chapters are critical, often polemical, engagements with the question of the Anthropocene and the changing conversation around reading, interpretation, and textuality. They exemplify a range of work from across the globe and will be of great interest to scholars and students of the environmental humanities, ecocriticism, and literary studies.

Download Ebook Readings in the Anthropocene PDF

Readings in the Anthropocene

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Publisher : Bloomsbury Publishing USA
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ISBN : 9781501307768
Pages : 288 pages
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Summary Book Review Readings in the Anthropocene :

Download or read book in PDF Readings in the Anthropocene written by Sabine Wilke and published by Bloomsbury Publishing USA. This book was released on 2017-09-21 with total page 288 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Readings in the Anthropocene brings together scholars from German Studies and beyond to interpret the German tradition of the last two hundred years from a perspective that is mindful of the challenge posed by the concept of the Anthropocene. This new age of man, unofficially pronounced in 2000, holds that humans are becoming a geological force in shaping the Earth's future. Among the biggest challenges facing our future are climate change, accelerated species loss, and a radical transformation of land use. What are the historical, philosophical, cultural, literary, and artistic responses to this new concept? The essays in this volume bring German culture to bear on what it means to live in the Anthropocene from a historical, ethical, and aesthetic perspective.

Download Ebook Early Anthropocene Literature in Britain, 1750–1884 PDF

Early Anthropocene Literature in Britain, 1750–1884

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Publisher : Springer Nature
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ISBN : 9783030532468
Pages : 246 pages
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Summary Book Review Early Anthropocene Literature in Britain, 1750–1884 :

Download or read book in PDF Early Anthropocene Literature in Britain, 1750–1884 written by Seth T. Reno and published by Springer Nature. This book was released on 2020-08-19 with total page 246 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book questions when exactly the Anthropocene began, uncovering an “early Anthropocene” in the literature, art, and science of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Britain. In chapters organized around the classical elements of Earth, Fire, Water, and Air, Seth Reno shows how literary writers of the Industrial Era borrowed from scientists to capture the changes they witnessed to weather, climate, and other systems. Poets linked the hellish flames of industrial furnaces to the magnificent, geophysical force of volcanic explosions. Novelists and painters depicted cloud formations and polluted urban atmospheres as part of the emerging discipline of climate science. In so doing, the subjects of Reno’s study—some famous, some more obscure—gave form to a growing sense of humans as geophysical agents, capable of reshaping Earth itself. Situated at the interaction of literary studies, environmental studies, and science studies, Early Anthropocene Literature in Britain tells the story of how writers heralded, and wrestled with, Britain’s role in sparking the now-familiar “epoch of humans.”

Download Ebook Break Up the Anthropocene PDF

Break Up the Anthropocene

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Publisher : U of Minnesota Press
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ISBN : 9781452962528
Pages : 86 pages
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Rating : 4.4/5 (529 users download)

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Summary Book Review Break Up the Anthropocene :

Download or read book in PDF Break Up the Anthropocene written by Steve Mentz and published by U of Minnesota Press. This book was released on 2019-05-29 with total page 86 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Takes the singular eco-catastrophic “Age of Man” and redefines this epoch We live in a new world: the Anthropocene. The Age of Man is defined in many ways, and most dramatically through climate change, mass extinction, and human marks in the geological record. Ideas of the Anthropocene spill out from the geophysical sciences into the humanities, social sciences, the arts, and mainstream debates—but it’s hard to know what the new coinage really means. Break Up the Anthropocene argues that this age should subvert imperial masculinity and industrial conquest by opening up the plural possibilities of Anthropocene debates of resilience, adaptation, and the struggle for environmental justice. Forerunners: Ideas First Short books of thought-in-process scholarship, where intense analysis, questioning, and speculation take the lead

Download Ebook The Anthropocene PDF

The Anthropocene

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Publisher : Routledge
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ISBN : 9781000474336
Pages : 194 pages
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Summary Book Review The Anthropocene :

Download or read book in PDF The Anthropocene written by Seth T. Reno and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2021-11-23 with total page 194 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Perhaps no concept has become dominant in so many fields as rapidly as the Anthropocene. Meaning "The Age of Humans," the Anthropocene is the proposed name for our current geological epoch, beginning when human activities started to have a noticeable impact on Earth’s geology and ecosystems. Long embraced by the natural sciences, the Anthropocene has now become commonplace in the humanities and social sciences, where it has taken firm enough hold to engender a thoroughgoing assessment and critique. Why and how has the geological concept of the Anthropocene become important to the humanities? What new approaches and insights do the humanities offer? What narratives and critiques of the Anthropocene do the humanities produce? What does it mean to study literature of the Anthropocene? These are the central questions that this collection explores. Each chapter takes a decidedly different humanist approach to the Anthropocene, from environmental humanities to queer theory to race, illuminating the important contributions of the humanities to the myriad discourses on the Anthropocene. This volume is designed to provide concise overviews of particular approaches and texts, as well as compelling and original interventions in the study of the Anthropocene. Written in an accessible style free from disciplinary-specific jargon, many chapters focus on well-known authors and texts, making this collection especially useful to teachers developing a course on the Anthropocene and students undertaking introductory research. This collection provides truly innovative arguments regarding how and why the Anthropocene concept is important to literature and the humanities.

Download Ebook Planet Work PDF

Planet Work

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Publisher : Rutgers University Press
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ISBN : 9781684484607
Pages : 219 pages
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Rating : 4.6/5 (844 users download)

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Summary Book Review Planet Work :

Download or read book in PDF Planet Work written by Ryan Hediger and published by Rutgers University Press. This book was released on 2022-12-09 with total page 219 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Labor and labor norms orient much of contemporary life, organizing our days and years and driving planetary environmental change. Yet, labor, as a foundational set of values and practices, has not been sufficiently interrogated in the context of the environmental humanities for its profound role in climate change and other crises. This collection of essays demonstrates the urgent need to rethink models and customs of labor and leisure in the Anthropocene. Recognizing the grave traumas and hazards plaguing planet Earth, contributors expose fundamental flaws in ideas of work and search for ways to redirect cultures toward more sustainable modes of life. These essays evaluate Anthropocene frames of interpretation, dramatize problems and potentials in regimes of labor, and explore leisure practices such as walking and storytelling as modes of recasting life, while a coda advocates reviving notions of work as craft.

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Theories of History

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Publisher : Bloomsbury Publishing
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ISBN : 9781474271318
Pages : 264 pages
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Rating : 4.4/5 (742 users download)

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Summary Book Review Theories of History :

Download or read book in PDF Theories of History written by Michael J. Kelly and published by Bloomsbury Publishing. This book was released on 2018-05-17 with total page 264 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book is open access and available on www.bloomsburycollections.com. It is funded by Knowledge Unlatched. In a unique approach to historical representations, the central question of this book is 'what is history?' By describing 'history' through its supplementary function to the field of history, rather than the ground of a study, this collection considers new insights into historical thinking and historiography across the humanities. It fosters engagement from around the disciplines in historical thinking and, from that, invites historians and philosophers of history to see clearly the impact of their work outside of their own specific fields, and encourages deep reflection on the role of historical production in society. As such, Theories of History opens up for the first time a truly cross-disciplinary dialogue on history and is a unique intervention in the study of historical representation. Essays in this volume discuss music history, linguistics, theater studies, paintings, film, archaeology and more. This book is essential reading for those interested in the practice and theories of history, philosophy, and the humanities more broadly. Readers of this volume are not only witness to, but also part of the creation of, radical new discourses in and ways of thinking about, doing and experiencing history.

Download Ebook The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Climate PDF

The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Climate

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Publisher : Cambridge University Press
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ISBN : 9781009076913
Pages : pages
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Summary Book Review The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Climate :

Download or read book in PDF The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Climate written by Adeline Johns-Putra and published by Cambridge University Press. This book was released on 2022-03-31 with total page pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Investigating the relationship between literature and climate, this Companion offers a genealogy of climate representations in literature while showing how literature can help us make sense of climate change. It argues that any discussion of literature and climate cannot help but be shaped by our current - and inescapable - vantage point from an era of climate change, and uncovers a longer literary history of climate that might inform our contemporary climate crisis. Essays explore the conceptualisation of climate in a range of literary and creative modes; they represent a diversity of cultural and historical perspectives, and a wide spectrum of voices and views across the categories of race, gender, and class. Key issues in climate criticism and literary studies are introduced and explained, while new and emerging concepts are discussed and debated in a final section that puts expert analyses in conversation with each other.

Download Ebook The News at the Ends of the Earth PDF

The News at the Ends of the Earth

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Publisher : Duke University Press
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ISBN : 9781478004486
Pages : 328 pages
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Summary Book Review The News at the Ends of the Earth :

Download or read book in PDF The News at the Ends of the Earth written by Hester Blum and published by Duke University Press. This book was released on 2019-05-10 with total page 328 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: From Sir John Franklin's doomed 1845 search for the Northwest Passage to early twentieth-century sprints to the South Pole, polar expeditions produced an extravagant archive of documents that are as varied as they are engaging. As the polar ice sheets melt, fragments of this archive are newly emergent. In The News at the Ends of the Earth Hester Blum examines the rich, offbeat collection of printed ephemera created by polar explorers. Ranging from ship newspapers and messages left in bottles to menus and playbills, polar writing reveals the seamen wrestling with questions of time, space, community, and the environment. Whether chronicling weather patterns or satirically reporting on penguin mischief, this writing provided expedition members with a set of practices to help them survive the perpetual darkness and harshness of polar winters. The extreme climates these explorers experienced is continuous with climate change today. Polar exploration writing, Blum contends, offers strategies for confronting and reckoning with the extreme environment of the present.

Download Ebook After Nature PDF

After Nature

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Publisher : Harvard University Press
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ISBN : 9780674368224
Pages : 337 pages
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Rating : 4.6/5 (743 users download)

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Summary Book Review After Nature :

Download or read book in PDF After Nature written by Jedediah Purdy and published by Harvard University Press. This book was released on 2015-09 with total page 337 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Nature no longer exists apart from humanity. The world we will inhabit is the one we have made. Geologists call this epoch the Anthropocene, Age of Humans. The facts of the Anthropocene are scientific—emissions, pollens, extinctions—but its shape and meaning are questions for politics. Jedediah Purdy develops a politics for this post-natural world.

Download Ebook Deep Time PDF

Deep Time

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Publisher : Princeton University Press
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ISBN : 9780691235806
Pages : 320 pages
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Rating : 4.6/5 (912 users download)

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Download or read book in PDF Deep Time written by Noah Heringman and published by Princeton University Press. This book was released on 2023-01-03 with total page 320 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: How the concept of “deep time” began as a metaphor used by philosophers, poets, and naturalists in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries In this interdisciplinary book, Noah Heringman argues that the concept of “deep time”—most often associated with geological epochs—began as a metaphorical language used by philosophers, poets, and naturalists of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to explore the origins of life beyond the written record. Their ideas about “the abyss of time” created a way to think about the prehistoric before it was possible to assign dates to the fossil record. Heringman, examining stories about the deep past by visionary thinkers ranging from William Blake to Charles Darwin, challenges the conventional wisdom that the idea of deep time came forth fully formed from the modern science of geology. Instead, he argues, it has a rich imaginative history. Heringman considers Johann Reinhold Forster and Georg Forster, naturalists on James Cook’s second voyage around the world, who, inspired by encounters with Pacific islanders, connected the scale of geological time to human origins and cultural evolution; Georges-Louis Leclerc, Comte de Buffon, who drew on travel narrative, antiquarian works, and his own fieldwork to lay out the first modern geological timescale; Blake and Johann Gottfried Herder, who used the language of fossils and artifacts to promote ancient ballads and “prehistoric song”; and Darwin’s exploration of the reciprocal effects of geological and human time. Deep time, Heringman shows, has figural and imaginative dimensions beyond its geological meaning.

Download Ebook The Routledge Companion to Twenty-First Century Literary Fiction PDF

The Routledge Companion to Twenty-First Century Literary Fiction

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Publisher : Routledge
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ISBN : 9781134743773
Pages : 462 pages
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Rating : 4.1/5 (347 users download)

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Summary Book Review The Routledge Companion to Twenty-First Century Literary Fiction :

Download or read book in PDF The Routledge Companion to Twenty-First Century Literary Fiction written by Daniel O'Gorman and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2019-01-15 with total page 462 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The study of contemporary fiction is a fascinating yet challenging one. Contemporary fiction has immediate relevance to popular culture, the news, scholarly organizations, and education – where it is found on the syllabus in schools and universities – but it also offers challenges. What is ‘contemporary’? How do we track cultural shifts and changes? The Routledge Companion to Twenty-First Century Literary Fiction takes on this challenge, mapping key literary trends from the year 2000 onwards, as the landscape of our century continues to take shape around us. A significant and central intervention into contemporary literature, this Companion offers essential coverage of writers who have risen to prominence since then, such as Hari Kunzru, Jennifer Egan, David Mitchell, Jonathan Lethem, Ali Smith, A. L. Kennedy, Hilary Mantel, Marilynne Robinson, and Colson Whitehead. Thirty-eight essays by leading and emerging international scholars cover topics such as: • Identity, including race, sexuality, class, and religion in the twenty-first century; • The impact of technology, terrorism, activism, and the global economy on the modern world and modern literature; • The form and format of twenty-first century literary fiction, including analysis of established genres such as the pastoral, graphic novels, and comedic writing, and how these have been adapted in recent years. Accessible to experts, students, and general readers, The Routledge Companion to Twenty-First Century Literary Fiction provides a map of the critical issues central to the discipline, as well as uncovering new perspectives and new directions for the development of the field. It is essential reading for anyone interested in the past, present, and future of contemporary literature.

Download Ebook Anthropocene Reading PDF

Anthropocene Reading

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Publisher : Penn State Press
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ISBN : 9780271080376
Pages : 377 pages
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Rating : 4.2/5 (71 users download)

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Summary Book Review Anthropocene Reading :

Download or read book in PDF Anthropocene Reading written by Tobias Menely and published by Penn State Press. This book was released on 2017-11-03 with total page 377 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Few terms have garnered more attention recently in the sciences, humanities, and public sphere than the Anthropocene, the proposed epoch in which a human “signature” appears in the lithostratigraphic record. Anthropocene Reading considers the implications of this concept for literary history and critical method. Entering into conversation with geologists and geographers, this volume reinterprets the cultural past in relation to the anthropogenic transformation of the Earth system while showcasing how literary analysis may help us conceptualize this geohistorical event. The contributors examine how a range of literary texts, from The Tempest to contemporary dystopian novels to the poetry of Emily Dickinson, mediate the convergence of the social institutions, energy regimes, and planetary systems that support the reproduction of life. They explore the long-standing dialogue between imaginative literature and the earth sciences and show how scientists, novelists, and poets represent intersections of geological and human timescales, the deep past and a posthuman future, political exigency and the carbon cycle. Accessibly written and representing a range of methodological perspectives, the essays in this volume consider what it means to read literary history in the Anthropocene. Contributors include Juliana Chow, Jeffrey Jerome Cohen, Thomas H. Ford, Anne-Lise François, Noah Heringman, Matt Hooley, Stephanie LeMenager, Dana Luciano, Steve Mentz, Benjamin Morgan, Justin Neuman, Jennifer Wenzel, and Derek Woods.

Download Ebook Surreal Entanglements PDF

Surreal Entanglements

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Publisher : Routledge
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ISBN : 9781000388343
Pages : 280 pages
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Rating : 4.0/5 (3 users download)

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Summary Book Review Surreal Entanglements :

Download or read book in PDF Surreal Entanglements written by Louise Economides and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2021-05-18 with total page 280 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This edited collection approaches the most pressing discourses of the Anthropocene and posthumanist culture through the surreal, yet instructive lens of Jeff VanderMeer’s fiction. In contrast to universalist and essentializing ways of responding to new material realities, VanderMeer’s work invites us to re-imagine human subjectivity and other collectivities in the light of historically unique entanglements we face today: the ecological, technological, aesthetic, epistemological, and political challenges of life in the Anthropocene era. Situating these messy, multi-scalar, material complexities of life in close relation to their ecological, material, and colonialist histories, his fiction renders them at once troublingly familiar and strangely generative of other potentialities and insight. The collection measures VanderMeer’s work as a new kind of speculative surrealism, his texts capturing the strangeness of navigating a world in which "nature" has become radically uncanny due to global climate change and powerful bio-technologies. The first collection to survey academic engagements with VanderMeer, this book brings together scholars in the fields of environmental literature, science fiction, genre studies, American literary history, philosophy of technology, and digital cultures to reflect on the environmentally, culturally, aesthetically, and politically central questions his fiction poses to predominant understandings of the Anthropocene.

Download Ebook Cultivating Sustainability in Language and Literature Pedagogy PDF

Cultivating Sustainability in Language and Literature Pedagogy

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Publisher : Routledge
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ISBN : 9781000369762
Pages : 160 pages
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Summary Book Review Cultivating Sustainability in Language and Literature Pedagogy :

Download or read book in PDF Cultivating Sustainability in Language and Literature Pedagogy written by Roman Bartosch and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2021-03-29 with total page 160 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book introduces the notion of "educational ecology" as a necessary and promising pedagogic principle for the teaching of Anglophone literatures and cultures in a time of climate change. Drawing on scholarship in the environmental humanities and practice-oriented research in education and literature pedagogy, chapters address the challenges of climate change and the demand for sustainability and environmental pedagogy from the specific perspective of literary and cultural studies and education, arguing that these perspectives constitute a crucial element of the transdisciplinary effort of "cultivating sustainability." The notion of an "educational ecology" takes full advantage of the necessarily dialogic and co-constitutive nature of sustainability-related pedagogical philosophy and practice while it retains the subject-specific focus of research and education in the humanities, centring on and excelling in critical thinking, perspective diversity, language and discourse awareness, and the literary and cultural constructions of meaning. This book will be of great interest to academics, researchers and post-graduate students in the fields of language, literature and culture pedagogy, as well as transdisciplinary researchers in the environmental humanities.

Download Ebook Extraction Ecologies and the Literature of the Long Exhaustion PDF

Extraction Ecologies and the Literature of the Long Exhaustion

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Publisher : Princeton University Press
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ISBN : 9780691230559
Pages : 304 pages
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Rating : 4.6/5 (912 users download)

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Summary Book Review Extraction Ecologies and the Literature of the Long Exhaustion :

Download or read book in PDF Extraction Ecologies and the Literature of the Long Exhaustion written by Elizabeth Carolyn Miller and published by Princeton University Press. This book was released on 2021-10-12 with total page 304 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: How literature of the British imperial world contended with the social and environmental consequences of industrial mining The 1830s to the 1930s saw the rise of large-scale industrial mining in the British imperial world. Elizabeth Carolyn Miller examines how literature of this era reckoned with a new vision of civilization where humans are dependent on finite, nonrenewable stores of earthly resources, and traces how the threatening horizon of resource exhaustion worked its way into narrative form. Britain was the first nation to transition to industry based on fossil fuels, which put its novelists and other writers in the remarkable position of mediating the emergence of extraction-based life. Miller looks at works like Hard Times, The Mill on the Floss, and Sons and Lovers, showing how the provincial realist novel’s longstanding reliance on marriage and inheritance plots transforms against the backdrop of exhaustion to withhold the promise of reproductive futurity. She explores how adventure stories like Treasure Island and Heart of Darkness reorient fictional space toward the resource frontier. And she shows how utopian and fantasy works like “Sultana’s Dream,” The Time Machine, and The Hobbit offer imaginative ways of envisioning energy beyond extractivism. This illuminating book reveals how an era marked by violent mineral resource rushes gave rise to literary forms and genres that extend extractivism as a mode of environmental understanding.